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HomeLatest NewsGlobal NewsAnalyzing Evergrande: Experts Explain Why it's Not a Major Concern

Analyzing Evergrande: Experts Explain Why it’s Not a Major Concern

Analyzing Evergrande

Evergrande defaulted in 2021, causing major losses for lenders, suppliers, and stockholders. The company’s share price is 99 percent below its high.

Highlights

  • Hong Kong court liquidates Evergrande, China’s largest real estate corporation.
  • It has $300 billion in corporate debt, the most in the world.
  • China, where 90% of the company’s assets are, may make liquidation difficult.
  • Evergrande defaulted in 2021, thus the worst is over.

Evergrande, the world’s largest debtor, is being liquidated by a Hong Kong court. Evergrande, China’s largest real estate company, has struggled for over two years to pay down its $300 billion debt.

There’s been significant discussion regarding Evergrande’s liquidation’s global effects. However, such worries may be unfounded. Evergrande defaulted in 2021, causing major losses for lenders, suppliers, and stockholders. The company’s Hong Kong share price is $0.16, down 99 percent from its peak.

Evergrande’s financial situation makes a comeback unlikely. Company assets total $242 billion, but debt exceeds $300 billion. Liquidation should reduce financial stress. The appointed liquidators wanted to “achieve a resolution that minimises further disruption for all stakeholders”. Alvarez & Marsal Asia liquidators’ managing director Wing Sze Tiffany Wong said, “Our priority is to see as much of the business as possible retained, restructured, or remain operational.”

Some obstacles remain in the implementation process. The Hong Kong court ruling for liquidation may raise jurisdictional concerns notwithstanding the “one country, two systems” mantra.

Over 90% of Evergrande’s assets are in China, making liquidation difficult. According to Deloitte’s global insolvency leader Derek Lai, the liquidator must follow mainland Chinese legislation, making it harder to take over Evergrande.

The state-run Global Times newspaper editorial prioritises common residents’ interests. Former chief editor Hu Xijin stressed the necessity of minimizing homebuyers’ losses during the Evergrande crisis.

The Chinese government’s main goal is to minimize purchasers’ losses and restore investor and homebuyer confidence in the real estate sector, which accounts for about 25% of GDP.

Domestically and globally, the crisis has lowered investor confidence in China. After several defaults, real estate companies are gone from the major market. US debt has dropped from $200 billion pre-pandemic to $42.5 billion.

China’s real estate business, like India’s, relies on pre-booking sales before property completion and is ready for fundamental changes. Avoiding uncertainty and delays from incomplete developments, investors prefer ready-made flats.

Company officials assure investors they are striving to finish projects.

According to Chinese media, incomplete projects may be sold or outsourced to developers to finish and deliver to clients. Restoring confidence is China’s government and real estate companies’ biggest issue.

China and Hong Kong’s equity markets, among the weakest in the world, show confidence deficits. Shanghai lost 13.06 percent last year and 18.73 percent over three years. Hang Seng fell 28.11 percent last year and 44.48 percent over three years.

Evergrande’s predicament isn’t comparable to 2008’s financial disaster. Chinese real estate is less indebted than US real estate was during the 2008 crash. However, the issues will affect Chinese infrastructure spending and global commodities prices.

Evergrande’s liquidation may extend China’s real estate sector and economy’s decline, but it won’t collapse.

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According to Chinese media, incomplete projects may be sold or outsourced to developers to finish and deliver to clients. Restoring confidence is China’s government and real estate companies’ biggest issue.

China and Hong Kong’s equity markets, among the weakest in the world, show confidence deficits. Shanghai lost 13.06 percent last year and 18.73 percent over three years. Hang Seng fell 28.11 percent last year and 44.48 percent over three years.

Evergrande’s predicament isn’t comparable to 2008’s financial disaster. Chinese real estate is less indebted than US real estate was during the 2008 crash. However, the issues will affect Chinese infrastructure spending and global commodities prices.

Evergrande’s liquidation may extend China’s real estate sector and economy’s decline, but it won’t collapse.

Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande Analyzing Evergrande

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